Difference between revisions of "XB-FEAT-6044533"

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This is the community wiki page for the gene ''nat8.9'' please feel free to add any information that is relevant to this gene that is not already captured elsewhere in Xenbase.
 
This is the community wiki page for the gene ''nat8.9'' please feel free to add any information that is relevant to this gene that is not already captured elsewhere in Xenbase.
  
=NCBI Summary for human NAT8B (N-acetyltransferase 8B (putative, gene/pseudogene)=
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=nomenclature changes=
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NOV 2019
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This gene represents one of 9 duplicated ''nat8'' genes identified by Xenbase during analysis ''Xenopus'' v9/10 genome annotation, all on Chromosome 1 in ''X. tropicalis'' and ''X. laevis'',  and is true ortholog of the human NAT8B gene, a psuedogene. See NCBI summary for human NAT8B below.
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Note that not all duplications are present in ''X. tropicalis'', and ''X. laevis'' does not always have both .L and .S homeologs.
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=Summary from NCBI for human NAT8B=
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The protein encoded by this gene is highly similar to the N-acetyltransferase 8 (NAT8) gene product, which is a kidney and liver protein with homology to bacterial acetyltransferases involved in drug resistance. This gene is localized on chromosome 2 in the vicinity of the NAT8 gene and may represent a pseudogene of NAT8. This gene contains two polymorphic nonsense mutations that disrupt the active site of the protein. The full-length product of this gene contains a complete acetyltransferase domain and is identical in length to NAT8. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]
 
The protein encoded by this gene is highly similar to the N-acetyltransferase 8 (NAT8) gene product, which is a kidney and liver protein with homology to bacterial acetyltransferases involved in drug resistance. This gene is localized on chromosome 2 in the vicinity of the NAT8 gene and may represent a pseudogene of NAT8. This gene contains two polymorphic nonsense mutations that disrupt the active site of the protein. The full-length product of this gene contains a complete acetyltransferase domain and is identical in length to NAT8. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]
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Annotation information
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Note: This gene is named as a pseudogene because some transcripts contain two stop codons, the latter one destroying the active site of the enzyme (PubMed 16395595). Because some variants exist without the stop codons, the NCBI RefSeq Project treats this as a protein-coding gene. [13 Feb 2013]

Revision as of 14:47, 30 June 2020

nat8.9

This is the community wiki page for the gene nat8.9 please feel free to add any information that is relevant to this gene that is not already captured elsewhere in Xenbase.

nomenclature changes

NOV 2019 This gene represents one of 9 duplicated nat8 genes identified by Xenbase during analysis Xenopus v9/10 genome annotation, all on Chromosome 1 in X. tropicalis and X. laevis, and is true ortholog of the human NAT8B gene, a psuedogene. See NCBI summary for human NAT8B below.

Note that not all duplications are present in X. tropicalis, and X. laevis does not always have both .L and .S homeologs.

Summary from NCBI for human NAT8B

The protein encoded by this gene is highly similar to the N-acetyltransferase 8 (NAT8) gene product, which is a kidney and liver protein with homology to bacterial acetyltransferases involved in drug resistance. This gene is localized on chromosome 2 in the vicinity of the NAT8 gene and may represent a pseudogene of NAT8. This gene contains two polymorphic nonsense mutations that disrupt the active site of the protein. The full-length product of this gene contains a complete acetyltransferase domain and is identical in length to NAT8. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]

Annotation information

Note: This gene is named as a pseudogene because some transcripts contain two stop codons, the latter one destroying the active site of the enzyme (PubMed 16395595). Because some variants exist without the stop codons, the NCBI RefSeq Project treats this as a protein-coding gene. [13 Feb 2013]